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WORLDCOMP'11 Keynote Lecture - Prof. Eugene H. Spafford

Last modified 2011-07-28 22:21

The Nature of Cyber Security
Prof. Eugene H. Spafford, Ph.D.
Executive Director, CERIAS (Center for Education and Research in Information Assurance and Security)
Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, CERIAS, USA

Download Slide Presentation for This Keynote

Date: July 18, 2011
Time: 09:50 - 10:45am
Location: The Monte Carlo Theater


Abstract

    There is an on-going discussion about establishing a scientific basis for cyber security. Efforts to date have often been ad hoc and conducted without any apparent insight into deeper formalisms. The result has been repeated system failures, and a steady progression of new attacks and compromises.

    A solution, then, would seem to be to identify underlying scientific principles of cyber security, articulate them, and then employ them in the design and construction of future systems. This is at the core of several recent government programs and initiatives.

    But the question that has not been asked is if "cyber security": is really the correct abstraction for analysis. There are some hints that perhaps it is not, and that some other approach is really more appropriate for systematic study - perhaps one we have yet to define.

    In this talk I will provide some overview of the challenges in cyber security, the arguments being made for exploration and definition of a science of cyber security, and also some of the counterarguments. The goal of the presentation is not to convince the audience that either viewpoint is necessarily correct, but to suggest that perhaps there is sufficient doubt that we should carefully examine some of our assumptions about the field.

Biography

    Eugene Howard Spafford is a Professor in the Purdue University. He is historically significant Internet figure, he is renowned for first analyzing the Morris Worm, one of the earliest computer worms, and his prominent role in the Usenet backbone cabal. Spafford was a member of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee 2003-2005,[2] has been an advisor to the National Science Foundation (NSF), and serves as an advisor to over a dozen other government agencies and major corporations.

    Spafford attended State University of New York at Brockport for three years and completed his B.A. with a double major in mathematics and computer science in that time. He then attended the School of Information and Computer Sciences (now the College of Computing) at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He received his M.S. in 1981, and Ph.D. in 1986 for his design and implementation of the original Clouds distributed operating system kernel.

    During the early formative years of the Internet, Spafford made significant contributions to establishing semi-formal processes to organize and manage Usenet, then the primary channel of communication between users, as well as being influential in defining the standards of behavior governing its use.

Academic Co-Sponsors
The Berkeley Initiative in Soft Computing (BISC)
University of California, Berkeley, USA

Biomedical Cybernetics Laboratory, HST of Harvard University
Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

Intelligent Data Exploration and Analysis Laboratory
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA

Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations (CACS)
University of Southern California, USA

Minnesota Supercomputing Institute
University of Minnesota, USA

Knowledge Management & Intelligent System Center (KMIS)
University of Siegen, Germany

UMIT, Institute of Bioinformatics and Translational Research, Austria
BioMedical Informatics & Bio-Imaging Laboratory
Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA


Hawkeye Radiology Informatics, Department of Radiology, College of Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa, USA

Supercomputer Software Department (SSD), Institute of Computational Mathematics & Mathematical Geophysics, Russian Academy of Sciences
SECLAB of University of Naples Federico II
University of Naples Parthenope, & Second University of Naples, Italy

Medical Image HPC & Informatics Lab (MiHi Lab)
University of Iowa, Iowa, USA

Intelligent Cyberspace Engineering Lab., ICEL, Texas A&M; University (Com./Texas), USA
Model-Based Engineering Laboratory, University of North Dakota, North Dakota, USA


Corporate Sponsor

Intel Corporation



Altera Corporation

Pico Computing

High Performance Computing for Nanotechnology (HPCNano)

International Society of Intelligent Biological Medicine

World Academy of Biomedical Sciences and Technologies
The International Council on Medical and Care Compunetics
The UK Department for Business, Enterprise & Regulatory Reform
Scientific Technologies Corporation

HoIP - Health without Boundaries


 


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